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As Radical as Reality Itself
Marxism and Tradition
Davidson brilliantly argues the case that Marxism should be seen as a living, breathing, critically engaged tradition.

Praise for How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions?:

"I was frankly pole-axed by this magnificent book. Davidson resets the entire debate on the character of revolutions: bourgeois, democratic, and socialist. He's sending me, at least, back to the library."—Mike Davis, author of Planet of Slums

In this book of essays Neil Davidson examines Marxism's relationship to previously existing traditions (the Enlightenment), as well as the precise boundaries of the Marxist tradition itself. With characteristic clarity and insight, he argues that tradition should not be seen as a set of eternally valid "lessons," but rather as a set of resources from which revolutionaries can critically draw.

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  • Understanding the British Election: An Interview with Neil Davidson

    With both the Labour Party and the Conservatives having launched their manifestos in recent days, Britain’s snap general election is gathering momentum. Jeremy Corbyn’s program has been widely described as Labour’s most radical and left-wing for decades; meanwhile, the Tories continue their sharp shift to the right under Theresa May. Added to this, Brexit and renewed calls for Scottish independence mean that the election is taking place in a context of profound change and uncertainty. Haymarket Books' Duncan Thomas interviewed Neil Davidson, British socialist and author of How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions?, to glean some meaning from the madness.


    Credit: Loz Pycock

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Other books by Neil Davidson

  • How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? (Abridged Edition)

    The globalized economy of the present is the result of political and social revolutions directed against pre-capitalist economic structures.
  • Nation-States

    Davidson argues that a Marxist understanding of the meaning of contemporary nation-states must begin from the inseparable connections between them.
  • We Cannot Escape History

    These essays focus on the two great themes of nation and revolution, and the third which links them: the state.
  • Holding Fast to an Image of the Past

    Davidson discusses how Marxism can retain a sense of historical tradition without becoming fossilized.