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Stateless Citizenship
The Palestinian-Arab Citizens of Israel
In this provocative and compelling work Shourideh Molavi documents the legal plight of Palestinians living inside of Israel.
Palestinians living inside of Israel are placed in a paradoxical situation where, as Arab citizens of a Jewish state, they are both inside and outside, host and guest, citizen and stateless. Through the paradigm of stateless citizenship Molavi centers our analytical gaze on the paradox that it is through their status as Israeli citizens that Palestinians are deemed stateless.
Reviews
  • "Molavi has produced a richly-textured, and deeply engaging account of Palestinians and their place in Israel's citizenship regime. In both its impressive theoretical framing and comprehensive critique of liberal claims around citizenship, this book promises to be an essential reference point for many years to come."
    —Adam Hanieh, author of Lineages of Revolt

    “Citizenship has historically assumed membership of a sovereign nation state within a territory over which the state has a legitimate claim. In the modern world marginalized people are denizens rather than citizens in territories that are politically contested. This situation has given rise to a new vocabulary of semi-citizens, paperless citizens, and stateless citizens to describe contested state borders. Shourideh C. Molavi’s study of Palestinian-Arabs is an important contribution to both political theory and the ethics of hospitality.”
    —Bryan S. Turner, The Graduate Center CUNY

    "[Molavi] has contributed to showing that the Israeli state, from its inception to the latest legislation, is far from being a democracy in its discriminatory treatment of its non-Jews."
    —Miriam Scharf, International Socialism
  • "Molavi has produced a richly-textured, and deeply engaging account of Palestinians and their place in Israel's citizenship regime. In both its impressive theoretical framing and comprehensive critique of liberal claims around citizenship, this book promises to be an essential reference point for many years to come."
    —Adam Hanieh, author of Lineages of Revolt

    “Citizenship has historically assumed membership of a sovereign nation state within a territory over which the state has a legitimate claim. In the modern world marginalized people are denizens rather than citizens in territories that are politically contested. This situation has given rise to a new vocabulary of semi-citizens, paperless citizens, and stateless citizens to describe contested state borders. Shourideh C. Molavi’s study of Palestinian-Arabs is an important contribution to both political theory and the ethics of hospitality.”
    —Bryan S. Turner, The Graduate Center CUNY

    "[Molavi] has contributed to showing that the Israeli state, from its inception to the latest legislation, is far from being a democracy in its discriminatory treatment of its non-Jews."
    —Miriam Scharf, International Socialism