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Leninism under Lenin
A winner of the Isaac Deutscher Prize Liebmann highlights democratic dimensions in Lenin's thinking as it developed over 25 years.

In this comprehensive and dynamic Deutscher Prize winning work, Liebman rises about the dogmatism and sterility that plague most appraisals of Lenin, and persuasively makes the case that the Russian Revolutionary's political ideas have an enduring relevance for today's activists.

Marcel Liebman was a historian of socialism and of communism.

Reviews
  • "I have not yet come across anything which captures so well the complexities of Lenin's positions, or which does so with anything like the same combination of commitment and detachment."
    —Ralph Miliband

    “From Leninism Under Lenin there emerges a living and eminently revolutionary Lenin, not a 'blunted’ one — that is, a Lenin who sometimes hesitates and makes mistakes, who seeks his way forward with the help of theory, which is not a ready-made answer to every problem…. There is a striking similarity with the masterly biography of Trotsky by Isaac Deutscher.”
    —Ernest Mandel

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