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See You Soon

From New York Times Bestselling Author Mariame Kaba, a poignant, beautifully illustrated story of a little girl’s worries when her Mama goes to jail, and the love that bridges the distance between them.

Even though I’m away,

My love is always here to stay.
See you soon, Queenie.
Love, Mama

Queenie loves living with Mama and Grandma Louise. Together, they go to the grocery store, eat ice cream, and play games in the park. Mama braids Queenie’s hair and helps her with her homework.

Sometimes, when Mama is sick, she has to go away. One day, Queenie and Grandma ride the bus with Mama to the county jail.

Queenie is worried about what will happen when Mama goes to jail. She’s afraid to ask questions, and overcome with feelings of worry and sadness. Does Mama have a warm bed to sleep in? When will Queenie see her again?

Soon after she and Grandma return home, Queenie opens a letter from Mama, and savors every word. She knows her Mama loves her, and looks forward to their upcoming visit. 

Other books by Mariame Kaba

  • We Do This 'Til We Free Us

    A reflection on prison industrial complex abolition and a vision for collective liberation from organizer and educator Mariame Kaba.

  • Missing Daddy

    A father and daughter's love cannot be broken even when prison bars separate them.

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