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Change Everything
Racial Capitalism and the Case for Abolition

One of the century’s most brilliant activist-scholars explains why the criminal justice system must be dismantled.

Racial, gender, and environmental justice. Class war. Militarism. Interpersonal violence. Old age security. This is not the vocabulary many use to critique the prison-industrial complex.

But in this series of powerful lectures, Ruth Wilson Gilmore shows that the only way to dismantle systems and logics of control and punishment is to change questions, categories, and campaigns from the ground up.

Abolitionism doesn’t just say no to police, prisons, border control, and the current punishment system. It requires persistent organizing for what we need, organizing that’s already present in the efforts people cobble together to achieve access to schools, health care and housing, art and meaningful work, and freedom from violence and want.

As Gilmore makes plain, “Abolition requires that we change one thing: everything.”

Change Everything is the inaugural book in the new Abolitionist Papers book series, edited by Naomi Murakawa.

Series
Reviews
  • “Ruthie has always been very clear that prison abolition is not just about closing prisons. It’s a theory of change.”—Michelle Alexander, author, The New Jim Crow

    “In three decades of advocating for prison abolition, the activist and scholar has helped transform how people think about criminal justice.”New York Times Magazine

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Other books by Ruth Wilson Gilmore

  • Change Everything

    One of the century’s most brilliant activist-scholars explains why the criminal justice system must be dismantled.

Other books of interest

  • A Time to Die

    The essential first hand account of the Attica Prison rebellion, back in print for the 40th anniversary of the uprising
  • Freedom Is a Constant Struggle

    Activist, teacher, author and icon of the Black Power movement Angela Davis talks Ferguson, Palestine, and prison abolition.
  • How We Get Free

    "If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free." —Combahee River Collective Statement
  • The Long Term

    Edited by Alice Kim, Erica Meiners, et al.

    Powerful, provocative narratives of people surviving the devastating affects of life in long term incarceration.

  • Missing Daddy

    A father and daughter's love cannot be broken even when prison bars separate them.