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Black Politics
  • From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation (Expanded Second Edition)

    This updated and expanded edition of Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor 's groundbreaking book features a new chapter and a foreword by Angela Y. Davis.

  • Haunted by Slavery

    A stirring memoir by Gwendolyn Midlo Hall: historian of slavery, veteran political activist, and widow of Black Bolshevik author Harry Haywood.

  • We Do This 'Til We Free Us

    A reflection on prison industrial complex abolition and a vision for collective liberation from organizer and educator Mariame Kaba.

  • Doppelgangbanger

    In his highly anticipated second poetry collection, Doppelgangbanger, Cortney Lamar Charleston examines the performance of Black masculinity in the U.S., and its relationship to family, love and community.

  • Black Lives Matter at School

    Black Lives Matter at School connects thousands of educators around the country who are fighting racial and economic inequality in schools. 

  • We Still Here

    In the midst of loss and death and suffering, our charge is to figure out what freedom really means—and how we take steps to get there.

  • Black Power Afterlives

    A powerful and wide-ranging collection examining the persistent impact of the Black Panther Party on subsequent liberation struggles.

  • The Brother You Choose

    Former Black Panthers Paul Coates and Eddie Conway discuss lives, politics, and their friendship that helped Eddie survive decades in prison.

  • Too Much Midnight

    Krista Franklin’s work emerges at the intersection of poetics, popular culture, and the dynamic histories of the African Diaspora. Krista lives in Chicago, IL.

  • Can I Kick It?

    Award-winning poet and playwright Idris Goodwin interrogates and remixes our cultural past in order to make sense of our present and potential futures.

  • Missing Daddy

    A father and daughter's love cannot be broken even when prison bars separate them.

  • Things That Make White People Uncomfortable

    Super Bowl Champion and three-time Pro Bowler Michael Bennett is an outspoken proponent for social justice and a man without a censor.

  • Things That Make White People Uncomfortable (Adapted for Young Adults)

    Super Bowl Champion and three-time Pro Bowler Michael Bennett is an outspoken proponent for social justice and a man without a censor.

  • 1919

    Reflections on race, class, violence, segregation, and the hidden histories that shape our divided urban landscapes.
  • Repair

    A compelling case for reparations based on powerful, first person accounts detailing both the horrors of slavery and past promises made to its survivors.

  • Build Yourself a Boat

    Build Yourself a Boat redefines the language of collective and individual trauma through lyric and memory.

  • Black Queer Hoe

    A refreshing, unapologetic intervention into ongoing conversations about the line between sexual freedom and sexual exploitation.
  • The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2

    A BreakBeat Poets anthology to celebrate and canonize the words of Black women across the diaspora.
  • C. L. R. James and Revolutionary Marxism

    CLR James and Revolutionary Marxism collects some of the most important, but difficult to obtain, articles from the legendary Trinidadian-Marxist.
  • Class Struggle and the Color Line

    A thoughtful collection of original documents highlighting the deep, early roots of Black radicalism in the US from 1900-1930.
  • Organized Labor and the Black Worker, 1619-1981

    A classic, radical history of Black workers' contribution to the American labor movement.
  • How We Get Free

    "If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free." —Combahee River Collective Statement
  • Black Liberation and the American Dream

    Edited by Paul Le Blanc
    Analysing intersections of race, class, and gender alongside primary texts, this unique volume explores racism and antiracism in the US.
  • A Beautiful Ghetto

    Allen asks us to see beyond the the violence and poverty that all too often defines the "ghetto."